Domesticity Inc.

Team Members: Kai Liao, Sabrina Ramirez-Diaz and Madelyn Willey


Not long ago --in the Information Age-- we were witness to technological advancements allowing people to labor remotely, transforming notions of what constitutes the workplace. Suddenly, spaces of leisure, intimacy, and family dwelling were unable to escape the glowing light of our various technological devices --work entered all aspects of life, even to the privacy of the domestic realm.

Throughout all fields and markets, employees were faced with conflicting relationships between family and the home as spending time with family jeopardized efficient production. The line between living and working continued to blur as the individual gave up trying to separate the two. As many predicted, work became the only constant in one’s life and the desire to stop working, to socialize, eventually disappeared. Wasting valuable time with family, was now an unnecessary burden.

Today --at the culmination of the Digital Revolution-- the family as we know it no longer exists. One spends every waking hour working only to achieve greater levels of production and efficiency. Without the family, the need for the home disappeared.
In the same manner that technological advancements were able to introduce instances of privacy and modify public and private behavior patterns  --for instance: the introduction of better sewer systems that brought clean water to individual homes, and thus modifying common bathing habits --technology has also been the means for removing them.
Constant interfacing with machines increased integration rather than individuation as a system of sensory perception. All is common and everything is now public.

History repeats itself.





   









Sabrina Ramirez-Diaz











Originally from Tijuana, Mexico, Sabrina is a designer that resides and practices in Los Angeles, CA.
She received her Bachelor of Architecture from  the University of Southern California School of Architecture and her Master in Architecture from Harvard University Graduate School of Design.



arlynramirezdiaz@gsd.harvard.edu
323-352-6162